New York Public Library 

Research, UX/UI, Strategy

 

Hacking the ‘Holds’ List- NYPL Site Redesign

A front-end user experience consisting of a full browser-based application, and mobile application. This application includes a personal docket with search and recommendation capabilities, a community view of media as requested and prioritized by NYPL patrons, a personal calendar, and a community calendar with current and local events. 

User research revealed that the seemingly most active patrons of NYPL were well acquainted with the Holds List, including ‘hacking’ the system to create a Wikipedia-style recommendation engine for themselves. We set out to make a system that further explored that behavior and captured it in a robust manner. We also sought to align our product with the wishes of the NYPL to not capture user behavior, while also constructing a product that caters to user needs for modern recommendation technology.

A forward-looking interactive list, or docket, that provides recommendations to users based on available library resources and the prioritization of those resources by the NYPL community at large. When library resources are unavailable for media that is of high priority to the patron, the app directs the patron to either an online affiliate (like Amazon) or to a local physical location, such as an area bookstore. These redirects hinge on the good will of patrons who are willing to use affiliate links, with a monetary cut to the library, to purchase products when the library can not meet their demand.

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Web Prototype:

Mobile Prototype:

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Product Hypothesis:

A forward-looking interactive list, or docket, that provides recommendations to users based on available library resources and the prioritization of those resources by the NYPL community at large. When library resources are unavailable for media that is of high priority to the patron, the app directs the patron to either an online affiliate (like Amazon) or to a local physical location, such as an area bookstore. These redirects hinge on the good will of patrons who are willing to use affiliate links, with a monetary cut to the library, to purchase products when the library can not meet their demand.

Phase II:

 

Additional attributes of this product includes three parts: 

A database of all media content, tagged with user demand and priority of demand (e.g. “Hunger Games was selected by 247 patrons to be read in the next 7 days and by 541 patrons to be read in the next 14 days”). 

This database is accessible through a CMS system by NYPL administration, with privileges that includes an information dashboard highlighting trends in media consumption and frictions in media prioritization and logistics. Phase II of this build will include the ability to add and remove media content, as necessary.